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Lamb Genealogy

Colonel John Lamb

Colonel John Lamb
John Lamb was born 1 Jan 1735 in New York.

He was the son of Anthony Lamb. His father was a convicted burglar who was transported to the colonies in the 1720s. John was initially trained as an optician and instrument maker in New York City and became a prosperous wine merchant.

Prior to the Revolutionary War, Lamb was a leading member of the Sons of Liberty.[1] He wrote articles in the and published anonymous handbills.

John Lamb served in the Revolutionary War and was slightly wounded and captured in Quebec for a short time. He had a son, Gaylord Lamb.

Gaylord Lamb was a Quaker and outspoken against slavery in NC.
Gaylord had a son, Salathel Lamb.

Salathel Lamb was b Aug. 9, 1785. married Mary Leonard, b 1790, in NC.
He was a skilled cabinet maker, blacksmith and mechanic.
Salathel and Mary had a son,
John Washington Lamb,
born 7 Feb or Mar 1810 in Guilford Co NC.

NOTE: There are at least 7 John Lambs in Guilford County at this time.

The remaining info has been passed down from my grandparents and also written in the obituaries of John T Lamb and Patsey Lamb:

John Lamb and John Green(e) were partners.
John Green(e) had a daughter,
Martha Elizabeth "Patsey" Green(e), b 27 Mar 1810 in Guilford Co NC.
 On Oct. 14, 1830 Patsey Green(e) married her father's partner, John Lamb, in Guilford Co NC. According to John T Lamb obit, Mrs. Lamb was a descendant of General NATHANIEL GREENE, of Revolutionary fame, and inherited the dislike of involuntary servitude which characterized the Quaker family to which she belonged. She is said to have planted the cotton, cultivated the plants, picked the crop, spun the tread and wove it into the fabrics from which she made her wedding dress. She was a true type of the noble pioneer mother developed by the period in which she lived.

John Lamb and John Green(e) built 3 wagons to travel to Indiana.
They started out In the fall of1833 or 1835. It is not clear who all traveled but the group included John and Patsey Lamb and their
two boys, Calvin, age 5 and Hiram, age 7,
John Green(e) (not sure if his wife, Charity, was living at this time) and Salathel and Mary Lamb.  They traveled from Guilford County NC to southern Indiana.

NOTE: The Quaker settlements were in NORTHERN IN and it appears that they did not continue with the Friends connection after arriving in IN. Interesting that the areas where they settled look so similar to the Guilford Co NC area with rolling hills and so many trees.

John and Patsey first lived in Springville, Lawrence Co, IN, for one year. Then they moved to a farm in
Monroe County, IN, for 5 years, then moved in 1841 to Jackson Tnsp, Greene County, where they built a log cabin, settling in the dense woods which at that time were infested with wild animals, numerous and some of them quite dangerous. The original house in which he lived is still standing, being a two-story structure only five logs high, each log being three feet in diameter and lived for the rest of their lives. An obit for John T Lamb states that they joined the Baptist Church in 1843 in Monroe County IN. That would have been a trip from Jackson Tnsp so not sure that is correct.

John Green possibly settled in Hendricks County, Danville IN and remained there for the rest of his life.

Salathiel Lamb tombstone greene co indiana

Salathel Lamb settled in Monroe County, Indiana, then moved to Greene County and entered land north of Owensburg¸ (NOTE: That may be Lawrence Co) where he made a home and became one of the substantial citizens of the community. Salathel d Aug. 22, 1848 and was buried on the Joe Crum farm and later removed to Grandview Cemetery in Bloomfield, Greene Co IN.

NOTE: There was a Salathel Lamb that traveled from Guilford Co NC to Illinois and settled there with similar dates, not to be confused. 

Patsey Green Lamb
Click to enlarge, use back arrow to return.

Patsy (GREENE) LAMB[1810-1899} with her children, clockwise, Rachel (LAMB) GILLILAND [1836-1912], Matilda (LAMB) HATFIELD [1848-1918], John Thomas LAMB [1844-1911], Abigail (LAMB) DUGGER [1841-1904] and Elizabeth (LAMB) MCDOWELL [1840-19__]

ca 1898, Patsy (GREEN) LAMB, photo taken on the front porch of her son-in-law,
Francis Marion DUGGER's home on S. Seminary Street in Bloomfield IN.

Matilda Lamb Hatfield Indiana Great Great Grandmother

My grandparents gave this to my mom, it is in a large oval frame.

Matilda Lamb Hatfield
Born: 12/18/1848 Parents: John Lamb & Patsey Green(e) Lamb
Married: Jeremiah Hatfield 11/1/1866
Died: 2/24/1918

Mother of Laura Hatfield Rush

 

John T. Lamb

A few men in Greene county have been as long before the public as JOHN T. LAMB, of Bloomfield, and none have been more active and influential in furthering the interest of the community or done more to promote the welfare of the people of this part of the state.

Mr. Lamb springs from good old Colonial stock and on the paternal side traces his family through several generations to England, of which country his great-great-grandfather, Colonel JOHN LAMB, was a native. The Colonel Lamb came to America among the early English colonists, and settled at Jamestown, Virginia, where he joined the army under Washington and served with distinction to the close of the struggle, rising by successive promotions from private to the rank of colonel.. He was with the commander-in-chief through all the varied experiences of battle, defeat and final victory, taking part in the different campaigns and engagements which made that period historic, was at Valley Forge and witnessed the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, which virtually terminated the war. He was a brave and skillful officer, distinguished for gallantry in action, and while leading his command against the enemy was several times wounded, but not seriously. GAYLORD LAMB, son of the colonel, and a member of the Society of Friends in North Carolina, where the family moved in an early day, was so radical and outspoken in his opposition to slavery that he aroused the dislike and enmity of many of his neighbors and fellow citizens, who were wont to apply to him and his family the epithet of "poor white trash", because, forsooth, he refused to utilize the labor of the poor unfortunate human beings held to involuntary servitude.

Among the children of GAYLORD LAMB was a son by the name of SALATHEL, a native of North Carolina, and by occupation a mechanic, having been equally skilled as a cabinetmaker and blacksmith. In 1833 SALATHEL LAMB and JOHN GREEN, his partner, and grandfather of our subject, made three wagons, in one of which the latter moved from Guilford county, North Carolina, to Hendricks county, Indiana, and settled near Danville, where he entered land, improved a farm and spent the residue of his life. Mr. Lamb, migrated about the same time to Monroe county, Indiana, thence removed to Greene county and entered land north of Owensburg¸ where he made a home and became one of the substantial citizens of the community, dying in that locality a number of years ago. JOHN LAMB, son of SALATHEL and father of the subject of this review, came to Indiana in the early thirties and lived on the home near Owensburg until 1883, when he retired to Bloomfield, where his death occurred in the year 1889. He was born in Guilford (now Greensboroug h) county, North Carolina, married there on October 14, 1831, PATSY GREEN, daughter of his father’s partner, and about the year 1843 became a citizen of Greene county, Indiana settling in the dense woods which at that time were infested with wild animals, numerous and some of them quite dangerous. The original house in which he lived is still standing, being a two-story structure only five logs high, each log being three feet in diameter.

Mrs. Lamb was a descendant of General NATHANIEL GREENE, of Revolutionary fame, and inherited the dislike of involuntary servitude which characterized the Quaker family to which she belonged.. She is said to have planted the cotton, cultivated the plants, picked the crop, spun the tread and wove it into the fabrics from which she made her wedding dress. She was a true type of the noble pioneer mother developed by the period in which she lived, whose whole life was a simple though grand peom of rugged, toilsome duty, faithfully and uncomplainingly performed. To JOHN W. and PATSY LAMB were born eight children, all but one that died in infancy growing to maturity – three sons and four daughters – two of the latter being deceased.

JOHN T. LAMB, sixth child and third son of the above couple, was born in Greene county, Indiana, June 10, 1844, and spent his early life on the home farm near Owensburg. While still a mere lad he learned by practical experience the true meaning of honest toil, and not many years had passed by ere he began maturing plans for his future course of action. In connection with labor in the woods and fields he attended, as opportunities afford, the subscription schools of the neighborhood. making the most of these limited advantages he became in due time fairly well educated, but it was not until after 1854 that he was enabled to attend free making the most of these limited advantages he became in due time fairly well educated, but it was not until after 1854 that he was enabled to attend free school and then for only a brief time. At the age of six years he had a severe and well nigh fatal case of spotted fever which, settling in his hips, made cripple, thus handicapping him not a little by keeping him from carrying into effect plans which otherwise ,might have materially modified his course of life.

When but sixteen years old Mr. Lamb entered upon his career as a teacher, from which time until 1868 he was engaged in educational work in connection with agricultural pursuits, discontinuing both these lines of effort in that year to embark in the mercantile businese. After selling goods for four years he accepted the position of deputy sheriff of Greene county, and, the better to discharge his official duties, changed his residence to Bloomfield, where he has since made his home. Retiring from the deputyship at the expiration of his term of four years, he resumed teaching and continued the same from 1876 to 1886, the meantime adding considerably to his reputation and income by teaching classes in vocal music. Mr. Lamb’s services as a vocalist were always much in demand,, being a fine singer and a very efficient instructor. He organized a number of glee clubs in different parts of the country, one of which, consisting of one hundred voices, became widely known and quite popular during the campaign of 1876. On several occasions during the contest of that year this club, in a large wagon drawn by forty-eight elegantly caparisoned horses, attended public rallies and was the chief object of interest to the crowds in attendance.

In 1886 Mr. Lamb was elected superintendent of the public schools of Greene county to fill a vacancy, and one year later was chosen his own successor, filling the office by successive re-elections three and one-half years and discharging the duties of the office in an able and acceptable manner, as the continuous advancement of the schools during his incumbency proves. Retiring from the superintendency, Mr. Lamb, in 1890, purchased the Bloomfield News, which he conducted in partnership with WILLAM B. MADDOCK for a period of nine years. The News was a weekly Republican newspaper and commercial job office, and upon taking charge of the News seventy-five per cent, of the offices of the county were held by Democrats, and upon selling out his interests to his son-in-law the county offices were held entirely by Republicans.

Mr. Lamb is a pronounced Republican and has long been an influential factor in his party, attending and taking an active part in conventions and other gatherings and contributing largely to the success of the ticket in Greene county. In 1896 he was elected chairman of the second congressional district and has also represented the same district on the Republican state committee, besides serving repeatedly on the county committee, where his services were of especial value. Since the above year, however, he has not been as active in public and political matters as formerly, devoting his time principally to the large real estate business in which he is now engaged and in which his success has been very satisfactory.

On, Januury 3, 1865, Mr. Lamb was untied in marriage to NANCY F. DUGGER, a native of Greene county..., and a union resulting in the birth of six children – two sons and four daughters, both of the former deceased. The older son, who lived to maturity, was an engineer, and met his death by accident in a mill. LITTA married C. W, ADAMS of Bedford; NORA is the wife of W. B. MADDOCK, of Bloomfield; CHARITY, now Mrs. WATLER T. BROWN, an abstractor and attorney and ex-superintendent of the Bloomfield schools, lives in Bloomfield; MARY, and alumnus of the State University, is still with her parents. Mr. Lamb owns forty-one acres adjoining the town of Bloomfield, and also platted eight acres, which is called Lamb’s addition to the town of Bloomfield. Mr. And Mrs. Lamb and family are members of the Christian church. Mr. Lamb has never used tobacco in any form and has never used intoxicants, and the family are all musically inclined.

Biographical Memoirs of Greene County, Ind. With Reminiscences of Pioneer Days, Illustrated (1908, B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, Indiana) Vol. 1 Pg 344-9.

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